LEARN MORE

Related Suppliers

dSpace Inc.

TRW Automotive

Zones



Continental Corp
On Electronics - April 2009

Reusing is eASEE It’s not uncommon to near the end of a software development cycle and lack the breadcrumbs to return to the original design, especially in the current environment of vehicle consolidation. Vector CANtech wants to make that process “eASEE.” Its new eASEE PLM software serves as a massive repository, but one that relationally links the data to map systems from legacy to contemporary software architectures. “It allows developers to share and reuse the data, but more importantly, to trace it once they’ve begun development,” says Mark Jensen, eASEE product line manager.


Reusing is eASEE 
It’s not uncommon to near the end of a software development cycle and lack the breadcrumbs to return to the original design, especially in the current environment of vehicle consolidation. Vector CANtech wants to make that process “eASEE.” Its new eASEE PLM software serves as a massive repository, but one that relationally links the data to map systems from legacy to contemporary software architectures. “It allows developers to share and reuse the data, but more importantly, to trace it once they’ve begun development,” says Mark Jensen, eASEE product line manager. The software is mainly geared toward electronic control units, including engine controllers, brake controllers, airbag controllers and body controllers among other ECUs. Initial eASEE modules addressed calibration data management, change management and project management; the company has since released requirements management and systems data management modules while test data management and product-in-release management modules will be introduced later this year.
The TRW integrated electronic control panel.
The TRW integrated electronic control panel, here in concept form, is designed for simplicity.
TRW’s New Panel
A new integrated electronic control panel (IECP) from TRW melds traditional HVAC controls and new telematics features into one design-flexible architecture for either highly contented or scaled-back center stacks. The human machine interface can be configured by manufacturers for capacitive touch sense (touch screens) and for Bluetooth interfaces with mobile and navigational devices. Next-generation designs expand the touch sensor technology and potentially could add gesture-recognition technologies. “We have created a demonstration unit that combines capacitive switching into a large dial to mimic a conventional rotary knob, but without moving parts,” says Carmon McEntaffer, engineering manager IECP and HVAC products, of the patent-pending technology.
Direct Digital Synthesis Board from dSPACE
Direct Digital Synthesis Board from dSPACE allows users to exchange data between a main application and one running on one of six digital signal processors in hardware-in-the-loop simulations.
dSPACE Ups Processing Power
An enlarged memory and new signal processors have more than doubled the speed of dSPACE’s Direct Digital Synthesis Board, a key component in hardware-in-the-loop simulation systems for fast electronic control unit testing. For example, the DS2302 board device simulates sensor signal waveforms to more precisely measure injection control voltages to calculate injection volumes in direct-injection engines, including those with variable valve lift. 


Sensing Soot
The Accusolve Advanced Diesel Particulate Filter Soot Sensor from GE Sensing & Inspection Technologies (www.ge.com) is designed to permit off-road and heavy-duty diesel vehicles to meet U.S. Tier 4 emissions regulations and improve filter life. The sensor uses GE radio frequency technology to measure soot levels in a filter to determine the optimal time to regenerate, or incinerate, the trapped particulates. GE suspects the sensor technology would be valuable to on-road vehicle filter applications, as well, and is working with OEMs to validate it.
XPOSYS GPS Chip
Despite its small size, the XPOSYS GPS chip boasts more locational accurancy, even indoors or in dense urban areas, than larger chips.
Itty-bitty GPS
That’s no optical illusion. Dwarfed by a match tip, the new 2.8 x 2.9-mm advanced GPS chip revealed by Infineon Technologies (www.infineon.com; Neubiberg, Germany) and Seiko Epson (www.epson.com; Nagano, Japan) is 25% smaller than the smallest GPS printed circuit board on the market. What’s more, the XPOSYS chip, jointly developed for embedded automotive electronics and the burgeoning cell phone navigation market, is claimed to be 50% more energy efficient than the next sized chip.

 

Comments are reviewed by moderators before they appear to ensure they meet Automotive Design & Production’s submission guidelines.
blog comments powered by Disqus