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1922 glass blowing

An Orrefors image from 1922 of glass blowing.

Something Swedish about Design

Something to consider during this period of automotive transitionThe Swedish crystal expert firm Orrefors (http://www.orrefors.se/main.asp) started business in 1898 where an iron factory had been sited since 1726.

Something to consider during this period of automotive transition

The Swedish crystal expert firm Orrefors (http://www.orrefors.se/main.asp) started business in 1898 where an iron factory had been sited since 1726. Because iron production was becoming less profitable, a foundry for glass making—for medical, service and dish glass—was established in the forested area of Småland. In 1914 the company started producing the crystal for which it continues to be renowned.
 
Something to consider about authenticity
“If you want to explore the full scope of Scandinavian design, Sweden’s glassworks are a natural source of inspiration. Large glass areas are also very much part of modern Swedish architecture, creating the special, light transparency.” That’s Steve Mattin, Volvo Cars design director. Although owned by Ford, Volvo is an iconic Scandinavian brand. “The clean lines of the Orrefors products have been a true source of inspiration for many years.” So for the Volvo S60 concept, the designers of Volvo worked with the artisans of Orrefors.
 
Something you won’t see in a production car
“The undulating, slightly twisted shape and the precise dimensional requirements were two exciting challenges we had to face. Crystal is a living material, shaped by living people. We are not used to working with tolerances of tenths of a millimeter. What’s more, we’re talking here about an exceptionally large piece of glass.” That’s Orrefors design manager Gunilla Arvidsson. The subject is a crystal center stack that flows from the instrument panel all the way back to the rear seat. It is 1.6-m long. Mattin: “The full-size crystal piece in the concept car will not be a production feature. However, it does open up opportunities to use crystal on a smaller scale in the future. We’ll have to see how our customers respond.