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MSC.SOFTWARE CENTRALIZES INITIAL ANALYSES

Providing a means by which engineering analysis can be accelerated is one of the drivers behind SimDesigner Enterprise from MSC.Software Corp. (www.mscsoftware.com; Santa Ana, CA), says Leslie Rickey, product manager.

Providing a means by which engineering analysis can be accelerated is one of the drivers behind SimDesigner Enterprise from MSC.Software Corp. (www.mscsoftware.com; Santa Ana, CA), says Leslie Rickey, product manager. She explains that the product is a CAD-embedded simulation platform. The CAD system into which it is embedded is Catia V5. Essentially, the SimDesigner package includes motion (rigid and flexible bodies), structures (linear and nonlinear), thermal, and crash/impact. In addition, there are gateways to other parts of the enterprise (including the ability to send email containing models). These gateways provide connection with higher-level tools including MSC.Nastran, Marc, and LS-DYNA.

According to Rickey, the approach here is to have a multidisciplinary, fully integrated solver rather than a series of point solutions. One of the things that this approach does is reduce the amount of time that’s necessary for creating models for different types of analysis. This is being done in one place. This also helps reduce the possibility of human error that might occur when creating new meshes for analysis of a particular design. Which goes to the point of integration with Catia (V5R16).

What Rickey sees is a situation wherein a design engineer, who has been trained in using the package, is able to run some initial analyses with the system, thereby minimizing the amount of work that the full-blown analysts need to do. This approach saves both time and money. There is another advantage in that the designer is able to run various preliminary analyses so that she is able to come up with a design that is closer to having the necessary functional and/or performance characteristics required. (This also means that there could be a reduction in the number of necessary physical prototypes—another advantage vis-à-vis time and money).

Another advantage of this more centralized approach that Rickey notes is that it facilitates control of the models, as they can be captured and reused, checked in and checked out. This helps assure that the latest versions of the models are being used. This approach also allows people to log in through a web client to see results even if they don’t have the software on their system.—GSV