Making Models

Despite the fact that there are design studios where “virtual” is replacing “actual” in vehicle development, for those who are interested in sticking with 3D models that they can see, touch and feel (without some goggles and sensor-ladened gloves), there is a new line of extrudable pastes from Axson Group (Paris; www.axson.com). The SC167 epoxy-based paste is said to provide superior mechanical characteristics for full-sized models when applied over polystyrene or polyurethane foam pre-machined forms, such as no bond lines.

Despite the fact that there are design studios where “virtual” is replacing “actual” in vehicle development, for those who are interested in sticking with 3D models that they can see, touch and feel (without some goggles and sensor-ladened gloves), there is a new line of extrudable pastes from Axson Group (Paris; www.axson.com). The SC167 epoxy-based paste is said to provide superior mechanical characteristics for full-sized models when applied over polystyrene or polyurethane foam pre-machined forms, such as no bond lines. One user of the material is ARTWARE DESIGN (Courbevoie, France), which used the paste to develop a full-scale model of the Citroen C4. In developing the model, 20 mm of paste was applied to a rough-milled polystyrene block. The paste was permitted to harden for 24 hours, then machined with a five-axis machine to final dimensions. Although the 24 hours is a comparatively long time for the material to set versus other materials, the paste is said to have less shrinkage and lower internal stresses.