LEARN MORE

Zones



Compact Crossover

Honda describes its new home market Crossroad crossover as an “active life navigator,” whatever that means.

Honda describes its new home market Crossroad crossover as an “active life navigator,” whatever that means. However, the boxy four-door is about the size of a compact car, has the functionality of an SUV, and carries up to seven passengers in its three rows.

The 168.7-in. Crossroad is powered by a choice of either a 1.8- or 2.0-liter i-VTEC four cylinder engines. Both are mated to a five-speed automatic, but Hill Start—this prevents the vehicle from rolling backward on an incline as the driver switches to the gas pedal by temporarily maintaining line pressure after the brake pedal is released—is available only on the four-wheel-drive version. Honda claims an effective minimum turning radius of less than 19 feet (measured from the front corner of the body), and fits the Crossroad with a MacPherson strut front suspension and compact reactive-link double wishbone rear suspension. To preserve room in the third row, the Crossroad does without a spare tire with a can of fix-a-flat.

The rear structure features a large cross-section and two internal impact-absorbing frames that feature polygonal cross-sections to better absorb rear impacts. In addition, the vehicle comes with intelligent cruise control and Honda’s Collision Mitigation Braking System. This gives the driver audio and visual warnings of an impending collision, and applies the brakes if necessary to reduce damage and injuries. Also, the passenger-side door mirror includes a prism in its lower section that gives the driver a view of obstacles or people close to that side of the vehicle. Honda says it has no plans to import the Crossroad, relying instead on the CR-V and Element to meet North American consumer needs.